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December 3, 2016

The Blazers led by 16 in the fourth quarter

Category: filmcherry452 @ 1:07 am

SAN FRANCISCO — Mike Leake has gotten stronger every year, and his fastball velocity has increased as a result. Even so, he still doesnt know where all those strikeouts came from. Leake allowed four hits in eight innings and had a career-high 12 strikeouts in the Cincinnati Reds 3-1 victory over the San Francisco Giants on Thursday night. “It didnt feel like that many,” said Leake, who allowed one run and walked one, which was intentional. “But I guess its a big accomplishment. Im not high on strikeouts.” Cincinnati manager Bryan Price thinks Leake (6-6) could be a strikeout pitcher if that was his goal. “Hes pretty consistent hitting 93, 94 mph with his fastball,” said the former pitching coach. “Thats not a fastball you have to apologize for. He could throw more pitches and be less effective but strike out more guys.” Brandon Phillips had three hits, including a home run and double, and scored twice in his return to the lineup for the Reds, who won their fifth in six games. Leake, still looking for his first major league shutout, didnt try to talk his way onto the mound for the ninth. He hasnt pitched a complete game in nearly two years. Aroldis Chapman worked the ninth for his 15th save in 16 chances. “We have a good closer, why not use him?” Leake said. Jay Bruce and Todd Frazier each added two hits for the Reds. Bruce doubled in the seventh and has an extra-base hit in each of his last seven games, the longest streak by a Reds player since Dave Parker did it in eight straight in 1986. “We seem to play well here,” Bruce said. “With this pitching staff, if you put runs on the board, you have a chance.” Adam Duvall, making his major league debut, hit a home run for the Giants, who lost for the 12th time in 16 games. Ryan Vogelsong (5-4) allowed a run on five hits over six innings one day after Tim Lincecum threw a no-hitter against the San Diego Padres. He struck out seven and walked one. “I rubbed up against him before the game, but it didnt work,” Vogelsong said. “I just wasnt good enough.” Jean Machi, who allowed Phillips home run leading off the seventh, had his scoreless streak end at 25 1-3 innings. Zack Cozart and Ryan Ludwick also drove in runs for the Reds, who have won eight of their last 10 games, including playoffs, in San Francisco. The Reds ended a scoreless duel with a run in the fifth. Phillips, who missed the last three games with a bruised heel, led off with a single. Two outs later, Cozart doubled him home. Bruce followed Phillips homer with a double and scored on Ludwicks single. Duvall hit a 0-2 pitch from Leake into the left field bleachers to put the Giants on the scoreboard. “Thats a feeling Ill never forget running the bases,” Duvall said. “I tried to tell myself it was the same game, just a bigger crowd.” Leake allowed a two-out double to Buster Posey in the first and then retired 15 of the next 16 hitters before Hunter Pences triple in the sixth. Leake improved to 4-0 with a 0.87 ERA in four starts at AT&T Park. The Giants also threw out two runners at home. Billy Hamilton tried to score on Devin Mesoracos shallow fly to second baseman Joe Panik in the sixth, and Brandon Crawford nailed Mesoracso trying to score on Phillips double to centre field in the eighth. NOTES: Frazier has a 13-game hitting streak against the Giants. … Chapman has at least one strikeout in each of his last 33 appearances, the longest active streak by a reliever and the fourth longest since 1900. . Reds LHP Tony Cingrani, optioned to Triple A Louisville on Friday, was placed on the minor league disabled list with a strained shoulder. That came as a surprise to the Reds, who sent him down to work. … RHP Johnny Cueto (7-5, 1.86), the major league leader in ERA, pitches for the Reds on Friday night. Hes won his last two decisions. . LHP Madison Bumgarner (9-4, 2.63) goes for the Giants. Hes 2-2 in five starts against the Reds. … Giants 1B Michael Morse was scratched because of illness. . Duvall became the 11th Giant since 1958 to homer in his first game. … The Junior Giants Stretch Drive Fund, created in honour of Hall of Famer Willie McCovey, began Thursday to help provide baseball programs in 90 underserved communities. Information can be obtained at the website jrgiant.org. Dominic Moore Jersey. The announcement was made by the hall on Friday, March 14. She joins Switzerlands Denise Biellmann as this years inductees to the Hall, based in Colorado Springs, CO. Ron Duguay Rangers Jersey.55 million euros (US$18.6 million) to Spanish tax authorities on Monday to cover any potential irregularities in its signing of Neymar, all the while maintaining its innocence of the fraud charges levied against it. http://www.therangersfanshop.com/Walt-Tkaczuk-Jersey/. PAUL, Minn. Dan Girardi Jersey. The St. Louis Cardinals were scheduled to arrive in Boston in time for a workout on Tuesday afternoon. Much of Mondays discussion focused on Bostons lineup considerations as the series progresses, specifically when the venue shifts to St. Antti Raanta Rangers Jersey. Not because it was right, but because referees werent allowed to determine it was wrong.Portland, OR (SportsNetwork.com) – LaMarcus Aldridge had 26 points and 15 rebounds and the Portland Trail Blazers led for the final 28 minutes of the game in a 107-93 win over the Minnesota Timberwolves on Sunday. Wesley Matthews scored 23 and Damian Lillard had 17 points and eight assists for the Blazers, who bounced back from Fridays streak-stopping loss to Memphis to win for the 10th time in their last 11 games. Shabazz Muhammad scored a career-high 28 points off the bench to lead the Timberwolves, who fell to 2-9 in their last 11. Mo Williams added 21 points and 11 assists and Thad Young scored 14 in the loss. The Blazers led by 16 in the fourth quarter and fended off a mini rally by the Timberwolves, who pulled as close as seven. Lillard had a big play when he knocked down a straightaway 3-pointer after a Minnesota turnover despite being fouled, giving Portland an 11-point lead with 4:10 remaining. It didnt get closer than eight after that. It was a struggle for most of the night just kind of getting into a rhythm, said Portland coach Terry Stotts. When we were able to get some stops in the second and third quarter, that was important for us. Thats whenn were at our best, when we get some stops.dddddddddddd Im disappointed that they scored 32 in the fourth quarter. I would have liked to have a better defensive fourth quarter. … But its hard to be too disappointed with a win. Williams scored 11 points and the Timberwolves led by as many as seven in the first quarter while turning the ball over just once. But the Blazers moved the ball well in the second and erased an eight-point hole with an extended 17-6 run keyed by two 3-pointers by Allen Crabbe that helped them take the lead for good with 3:50 remaining in the first half. They stretched the advantage to 48-40 at the break behind nine second-quarter assists and 16 points from Aldridge in the half. The Timberwolves were never closer than six in the third. Portland scored the last eight points of the quarter — Aldridge had five of them — to take a 75-61 lead into the fourth. Game Notes Portland has won four straight and 25 of the last 28 meetings between the teams … The Blazers play in Denver on Tuesday … The Timberwolves will finish a three-game road trip on Monday against the Clippers in LA. Cheap NFL Jerseys China ‘ ‘ ‘

November 11, 2016

some its players are held in the NHL

Category: artifizz,filmcherry452 @ 10:33 pm

Injured Tampa Bay Lightning star Steven Stamkos said hes feeling better after taking a day off from practice on Monday because his leg didnt feel right. Stamkos took to the ice at the Air Canada Centre on Tuesday morning – where the Lightning prepared to face the Toronto Maple Leafs – wearing a regular blue jersey and skated for about 20 minutes. “It felt a lot better today,” Stamkos said after the skate. “Just pain in certain areas. The bone is really strong, the x-rays look good – its more soft tissue issues.” Stamkos added that he still hopes to get games under his belt before the Olympic break and also discussed the possibility of playing in Sochi even if he doesnt play an NHL game first. “The objective is to play a game (in the NHL), that would be something I would really love to do,” he explained to the large scrum of reporters. “But if thats not the case, theres going to be another discussion about whether or not Im still going to be on that team if I cant play a game. Weve had brief discussions about that, its more or less been Well cross that bridge when (if) we need to.” Team Canada executive director Steve Yzerman just happens to be his NHL general manager in Tampa and Stamkos is prepared to have a discussion with him on all of his options. “If we have to sit down a couple of days before we have to leave for the Olympics, we can be honest with each other,” Stamkos said of his eventual chat with Yzerman. “If I say that Im at the level I think I need to be at to compete at the Olympics, I think hes going to have the trust in me that I can go over there and play at that level. But at the end of the day, I have to be honest with him. If I say Im not ready, obviously Im not going to go.” When asked about Stamkos comments that going to Sochi without playing an NHL game was a possibility, Yzerman confirmed its among the different options, again very much depending on where he is physically. “Were not going to rule anything out,” Yzerman told TSN Hockey Insider Pierre LeBrun over on the phone Tuesday. “We dont really have to jump to any conclusions yet. Its one step at a time. A week ago he had the X-Ray at the 10-week mark and the doctors advised him to increase the intensity of his workouts on and off the ice and see how he responds to that. So thats what hes done for the last week. Hes still hopeful to play at some point next week but we dont know yet if thats realistic or not. “Once he gets home from the trip hell meet again with the doctors and see what they come up with at that point. But until hes cleared for a game, whether its prior to leaving or not, theres not much really to say, but were going to keep all the options open and make the appropriate decisions when the time comes.” Stamkos fractured the tibia in his right leg in a Nov. 11 game against the Boston Bruins and underwent surgery the following day. He had 14 goals and 23 points in 17 games before the injury. The Lightnings final game before the Olympic break is Saturday, Feb. 8 against the Detroit Red Wings. http://www.thepersonalityshop.net/MLB/Custom-Los-Angeles-Dodgers/.com) – Matt Duchene picked up the deciding goal early in the third period and added an assist, as Colorado escaped with a 4-3 victory over Dallas at Pepsi Center. http://www.thepersonalityshop.net/Soccer-Country/Custom-Mexico/.J. — Patrick Sharp is on one of those streaks. http://www.thepersonalityshop.net/Soccer-Country/Custom-USA/. — Former NHL star Jeremy Roenick shot a second-round 69 to take the lead after 36 holes and former LPGA great Annika Sorenstam and Chad Pfeifer, who lost his left leg above the knee serving in Iraq, are among several players in contention in the American Century Championship tournament on Saturday. http://www.thepersonalityshop.net/Soccer-Club/. – The fiancee of former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez is set to ask a judge to throw out allegations that she lied to a grand jury. http://www.thepersonalityshop.net/NBA/Custom-Los-Angeles-Lakers/. — Pelicans coach Monty Williams does not expect guard Eric Gordon to play in any of New Orleans final five games this season.NHL hockey nears a return and Scott Cullen weighs in on what happened during the Olympics and how it will affect players and teams going down the stretch. Notes on Zetterberg, Tavares, Ovechkin, Kessel, Granlund, Crosby, Kunitz, Price and more. 1. Its been a big enough challenge for the Detroit Red Wings this season, battling injuries as they sit in the final playoff spot in the Eastern Conference, but as they return from the Olympics, they do so with the knowledge that star LW/C Henrik Zetterberg is out for at least the next eight weeks following back surgery. For the record, there are about seven weeks left in the regular season, so expecting Zetterberg for the first drop of the puck in the playoffs sounds a tad optimistic. No big deal. Zetterberg merely leads the Wings, with 48 points in 45 games and, at 20:33 per game, is one of two Red Wings forwards (Pavel Datsyuk, at 20:45 ATOI is the other) to play more than 18 minutes per game. Hes a puck possession star who plays tough minutes, so the Wings are going to be hard-pressed to replace Zetterbergs contributions. Certainly, if Datsyuk is healthy enough to play — and he was healthy enough to put up six points in five games for Russia at the Olympics — then that will help matters, but the Wings are still going to depend heavily on their young forwards that have been playing an increasing role as the season has progressed. That means the crew of Tomas Tatar, Gustav Nyquist, Riley Sheahan, Tomas Jurco, Darren Helm all have to raise their games if the Wings are going to survive Zetterbergs absence. The other option is that the Red Wings could use some of their organizational depth to acquire more immediate help. 2. The New York Islanders are, understandably, not thrilled about the prospects of spending the rest of the season without C John Tavares, who suffered a knee injury against Latvia but, provided he has a full recovery, there isnt much downside for the Isles. The Islanders, 12 points out of a playoff spot, werent going to contend for the postseason this year and are already preparing to move LW Thomas Vanek prior to the March 5th trade deadline. Under those circumtances, there will be some opportunities available for other Islanders, rookies Ryan Strome and Brock Nelson among them, to play more prominent offensive roles. Additionally, the loss of Tavares ought to ensure a higher draft pick for the Islanders. While the Islanders would prefer a healthy Tavares, if his absence results in picking a couple of spots higher in the summer, then thats not the worst thing in the world. If someone is potentially going to take a hit without Tavares, it could be RW Kyle Okposo, who has been having a career year playing primarily with Tavares and Vanek and will be rolling with new linemates over the final quarter of the season. 3. Rangers RW Mats Zuccarello, the teams leading scorer with 43 points in 58 games, suffered a broken hand while playing for Norway at the Olympics and is expected to miss the next couple weeks. While Zuccarello is out, that could offer more power play time for Blueshirts wingers, maybe even captain Ryan Callahan, who has been an afterthought in that respect, ranking eighth among Rangers forwards in power play ice time per game (1:47). Callahan has ranked first or second among Rangers forwards in power play time over each of the past three seasons. 4. Penguins D Paul Martin has endured a difficult campaign, missing 25 of 58 games already mostly due to a fractured tibia, and now he could miss another month with a hand injury. Since the Penguins are already going without Kris Letang, in the aftermath of his stroke, they are going to need to lean heavily on young defencemen. 19-year-old rookie Olli Maatta has been a revelation, scoring nine points (3 G, 6 A) in his past 11 NHL games and adding five points (3 G, 2 A) in six games for Team Finland at the Olympics. But the Penguins will need more than Maatta and Matt Niskanen. It could be an opportunity for Simon Despres, who hasnt been able to stick full-time with the Penguins, but has 22 points in 34 games with AHL Wilkes-Barre/Scranton. 5. Capitals RW Alex Ovechkin took plenty of heat for Team Russia coming up short on home ice, and with one goal and two points in five games, Ovechkin was due for criticism. At the same time, he had 24 shots on goal in five games (4.8 per), the kind of shot volume that would typically lead to more than one goal. It just so happened that, in this tournament, it didnt. Ive defended Ovechkins play in the NHL this season already, so theres no need to get too far into his Olympic performance. Could he have been better? Sure, but he was hardly alone in his performance and, considering the number of shots he generated, theres little reason to think he wont be able to continue scoring goals when Washingtons season resumes. Ovechkin wasnt the only Russian superstar to struggle. Penguins C Evgeni Malkin had a goal and two assists in five games, despite putting 20 shots on goal. Two goals on 44 combined shots (4.5%) from Malkin and Ovechkin is a difference-maker, in the wrong direction. In the NHL this season, Ovechkin has scored on 13.4% of his shots and Malkin on 12.6% of his shots, so if they managed to hold form on those 44 shots, that would have given them an expected 5.7 goals. But, sometimes in short series or tournaments, the pucks dont go in and the result was disastrous for home team Russia. 6. One of the stars for Team USA in Vancouver was Zach Parise, who had eight points in six games, including that late tying goal in the Gold Medal Game. It didnt quite work that way in Sochi, for Parise, however, as he was held to one goal and 11 shots in six games. Considering Parise has put up 3.91 shots per game for the Wild this season, his best rate since 2009-2010, and had nine points in seven games upon returning from injury prior to the Olympics, his lack of production was surprising. 7. If the Wild might be concerned about Parises Olympic showing, they have to be even more encouraged by the play of second-year C Mikael Granlund. Finland was shorthanded down the middle, with injuries to Mikko Koivu, Saku Koivu, Valtteri Filppula and, early in the tournament, Aleksander Barkov, thinning out the middle of the ice. No matter, as Granlund rose to the challenge, finishing with seven points (3 G, 4 A) in six games. The poing production is nice, and not completely out of line with his production in Minnesota, which includes three goals and 13 assists in the past 22 games, the last 15 of which have come while playing more minutes in the absence of Mikko Koivu. Whats more interesting about Granlund, however, is the 20 shots on goal he registered, the 3.33 shots per game a far cry from the modest 1.51 shots on goal per game hes averaged through his first 73 NHL contests. In the last handful of games before the break, Granlund had put up 20 shots on goal, so maybe there is some change coming to his game, and if hes generating chances more consistently, then its change for the better and Granlund may start living up to the hype that preceded his arrival in North America. 8. No player entered the Olympic break on the kind of roll that Maple Leafs RW Phil Kessel was, putting up 32 points (14 G, 18 A) in 21 games since Christmas and Kessel didnt miss a beat at the Olympics, leading the tournament with five goals and eight points, while playing a modest 15:20 per game for the Americans, which ranked sixth among U.S. forwards. Theres nothing to say that scoring in the Olympics will make Phil Kessel more legit in the NHL, but its encouraging to see that he was still a dangerous offensive threat against Olympic competition and the Leafs have to figure that Kessel and LW James van Riemsdyk (1 G, 6 A in 6 Olympic games) will be poised to lead them down the stretch as they battle for playoff position. 9. Blackhawks RW Patrick Kane took some heat for his lack of production (0 G, 4 A in 6 GP) for Team USA, but it only highlighted that Kane had been in a bit of a slump before going to the Olympics. In his past 18 NHL games, Kane has four goals and six assists and while Kane exploded in December, for 23 points and 55 shots on goal in 14 games, hes come back down a level from that peak production. 10. Islanders LW Thomas Vanek didnt do much for Team Austria, managing one assist and 10 shots on goal in four games, but the national team captain was also criticized in reports that noted Austrian players were drinking until 6 a.m. the night before their eliminationn game against Slovenia.dddddddddddd Its not going to affect Vaneks NHL trade value, because hes still one of the premier offensive players available as the trade deadline approaches, but its understandably disappointing for an Austrian team that had three NHL forwards on the roster. Islanders RW Michael Grabner (5 G, 1 A in 4 GP) and Flyers LW Michael Raffl (1 G, 2 A in 4 GP) were others. 11. Kings D Drew Doughty was spectacular for Team Canada, scoring four goals and six points in six games, prompting the question: is he reined in too much in Los Angeles? It may just be small sample stuff — Doughty had a very productive 2012 NHL playoff too (4 G, 12 A in 20 GP) — but its puzzling to see a player who had 59 points in 82 games as a 20-year-old continue to linger between 35 and 45 per season since. With 30 points in 59 NHL games, Doughty is on pace for 42 points this season, which would be his most since that 59-point season in 2009-2010. 12. The same question might be asked of Kings RW Jeff Carter, who had his selection questioned in some circles prior to the tournament, but Carter was clearly one of Canadas best forwards, using his speed to play strong defensively, backchecking and killing penalties, in addition to scoring three goals and five points in six games. Since the start of the 2008-2009 season, Carter ranks sixth with 182 goals but, as he showed for Team Canada, hes capable of more than merely scoring goals. 13. Penguins C Sidney Crosby was a story, particularly early in the tournament, as the narrative about him being so difficult to play with angle gained more legs. Crosby didnt produce much throughout the tournament, finishing with three points (1 G, 2 A) in six games, though his lone goal was both crucial and an impressive individual effort to give Canada a 2-0 lead in the Gold Medal Game. And, truth be told, Crosby created a bunch of chances in the semifinal against USA, even though he wasnt rewarded on the scoresheet. There has been research done on the subject that indicates playing with Crosby isnt such a daunting task, but when the Crosby line wasnt producing, the tendency was to pin blame on those with whom Crosby played which, in some respects, is letting Crosby off the hook. On one hand, there are legitimate arguments to make about player selection and coaching decisions about who gets to play with No. 87, but some of it has to fall on Crosby too. Its tough to be universally considered the best player in the world in a team sport — and he is — yet simultaneously difficult for anyone to play with. 14. Which brings us to one of the most criticized selections for Team Canada, Penguins LW Chris Kunitz, with the chrous perhaps reaching a crescendo during the 1-0 semifinal win over USA, when Kunitz had an altogether decent game, but missed several quality scoring chances that would have obviously helped provide insurance in such a close game. On Twitter, I wondered if Kunitz, an undeniably solid NHLer, whose next NHL goal will be No. 200, has his reputation raised because of the fact that he rides shotgun with Sidney Crosby. Team Canada brass made it clear that Kunitz was selected on the merits of his own play and that sounds reasonable enough for a player that has 107 points (49 G, 58 A) in 106 games since the start of last season. Of course, we could also compare that to someone like Oilers LW Taylor Hall, who has 106 points (36 G, 70 A) in 108 games over the same time period, and then consider that Hall is doing it with Ryan Nugent-Hopkins as his centre, and not Crosby, and thats where the water gets murkier. Players are valued on more than points alone, obviously, but there is an inherent challenge in figuring out the impact of a players linemates on their production. Trying to identify an individuals contribution is the challenge of player evaluation and one that is ever-evolving and its hard to separate Kunitzs production from the fact that its coming alongside the best player in the world. The thing is, for all the criticism of his inclusion among Canadas best 13 forwards, Kunitz is the kind of wonderful story that is easy to get behind. He was undrafted out of Ferris State, hardly a hockey factory, and didnt stick in the NHL for keeps until he was 26-years-old after being waived by the Atlanta Thrashers. Hes a hard-working two-way winger who had won a couple of Stanley Cups, a Gold Medal at the Olympics and is having the most productive years of his NHL career as he approaches his mid-30s. After scoring his only goal of the tournament to seal the Gold Medal win, Kunitz wont have to listen to the criticism and he and Crosby can prepare for a stretch run and potentially a new winger before the trade deadline. 15. Canadiens G Carey Price was excellent (0.59 GAA, .972 SV% in 6 GP) behind Canadas spectacular defensive effort, and now returns to a Montreal team that has been decidedly unimpressive defensively. The Canadiens are allowing 30.6 shots against per game, which ranks 21st, and their puck possession numbers have been declining steadily since the start of the season, so if those trends dont reverse, a lot of Montreals playoff hopes (or even getting to the playoffs), will depend on their goaltender. Hes been great this year, posting career-high .925 save percentage in 48 games, but the Canadiens need every bit of that greatness. 16. 43-year-old Ducks RW Teemu Selanne, whose role has decreased in Anaheim — he has 20 points (7 G, 13 A), with 13:57 ATOI in 47 games — turned up the heat for a brief run and was named MVP of the tournament, scoring four goals and six points in six games for Finland on their way to a bronze medal. It wouldnt be reasonable to expect Selanne to rise up for a big finish to the season, just based on some short Olympic tourney success, but it does leave open the possibility that perhaps he could be a productive complementary player for the Ducks in the postseason. 17. The Czech Republic team was in disarray at times, but Oilers RW Ales Hemsky had a strong showing, with three goals and an assist in five games, despite averaging only 12:01 per game (some of that disarray was in how ice time was allocated). Combined with his lesser role in Edmonton, theres a decent argument to be made in favour of Hemsky as a trade deadline acquisition who has some upside if plugged into a role alongside skilled players and allowed to play significant minutes. As noted in the Kunitz portion, it matters who you play with. 18. Sweden reached the final with an injury-depleted roster, but there were some odd decisions in their blueline deployment. Coyotes D Oliver Ekman-Larsson was glued to the bench for five of the final six periods of the tournament and averaged 9:43 per game, while Blackhawks D Niklas Hjalmarsson played 18:20 per game. This was also a team that left Lightning D Victor Hedman at home, so there is a definite disconnect between the Swedish team and the esteem with which some its players are held in the NHL. 19. Speaking of Swedish defencemen who are held in high regard, Senators D Erik Karlsson was a dynamo on the big ice, as might be expected with such an exceptional skater. Karlsson had four goals and eight points, tying Phil Kessel for the tournament lead in points. 20. Switzerland played an extremely buttoned-down game, scoring a total of three goals in four games, but NHL goaltenders Jonas Hiller (Ducks) & Reto Berra (Flames) turned in strong performances, combining to stop 96 of 99 shots faced. Certainly, there is some credit due to the Swiss defence, led by NHLers Mark Streit, Raphael Diaz and Roman Josi, for allowing just 99 shots in four games. 21. Blue Jackets D Fedor Tyutin is out for 2-3 weeks after suffering an ankle injury. He ranks third on the Columbus defence in time on ice (21:34 per game), so someone will have to take on more minutes, potentially Nikita Nikitin, whose ice time has decreased quite a bit to 17:12 per game thsi season after playing 24:35 per game for the Blue Jackets in 2011-2012. 22. Panthers C Aleksander Barkov suffered a knee injury at the Olympics and is out indefinitely. The Panthers were shallow enough down the middle this season that 18-year-old Barkov has been their No.1 centre. If the Panthers trade veteran centre Marcel Goc, that could really change the minutes available for the likes of Nick Bjugstad, Drew Shore and Shawn Matthias. Scott Cullen can be reached at Scott.Cullen@bellmedia.ca and followed on Twitter at http://twitter.com/tsnscottcullen. For more, check out TSN Fantasy on Facebook. Wholesale Jerseys ‘ ‘ ‘

Goodyear has warned teams that increased speeds at Charlotte Motor Speedway

Category: digital,filmcherry452 @ 10:32 pm

SAN FRANCISCO — The San Francisco 49ers know Aldon Smith still has plenty of work to do in order to repair his tarnished image and stay on track away from the football field. They want to be an integral part of his self-improvement project, exercising their 2015 fifth-year contract option for the star linebacker on Friday. The team made the decision despite Smiths long list of legal trouble that included an arrest at Los Angeles International Airport just more than two weeks ago. San Francisco faced a Saturday deadline to decide on Smiths immediate future, and general manager Trent Baalke suggested last week the team would keep the fearsome pass-rusher around for the near future at least — for 2015, “and 16, and 17 and 18.” The 49ers will provide Smith with the support he needs to deal with his rash of off-the-field issues. Yet Baalke has made it clear there must be positive change, and soon. San Francisco realizes Smith still could face a suspension from the NFL for his DUI last September, and is expected to look for depth at linebacker during next weeks NFL draft. “Well, that remains to be seen. You prepare for the worst and hope for the best,” Baalke said of a potential suspension for Smith. “There are still a lot of things that are going to factor into that decision at the league level and the club level. Were working very diligently in the background trying to make sure the right decisions are made long term, not only for Aldon but for this club.” In his latest run-in with the law, Smith was arrested April 13 at Los Angeles International Airport. Police say the 24-year-old NFL star was randomly selected for a secondary screening and became unco-operative with the process, telling a TSA agent that he had a bomb. The district attorney has referred the case for misdemeanour consideration. That followed Smiths five-game absence last season to undergo treatment for substance abuse after a September DUI arrest. In November, he pleaded not guilty to three felony counts of illegal possession of an assault weapon, stemming from a June 2012 party at his home. Investigators say several shots were fired, two partygoers were injured and Smith was stabbed. In the subsequent investigation, prosecutors say detectives found five unregistered, illegal weapons in Smiths house, including two Bushmaster rifles and an Armalite AR-10T. Yet, what Smith brings on the field makes him one of the NFLs best at chasing down and pressuring quarterbacks. Smith emerged as one of the leagues most-feared pass rushers in 2012. He had a franchise-record 19 1/2 sacks that year, but failed to record a sack in his final six games including the teams post-season Super Bowl run. Smith finished with 8 1/2 sacks and 34 tackles in 11 games last season, making eight starts. His 42 sacks are second-most in the NFL since he entered the league. He and former teammate Delanie Walker were named in a lawsuit last September filed in Santa Clara County Superior Court by a Northern California man who said he was shot at a party at Smiths house on June 29, 2012. The players charged a $10 admission and $5 per drink, the lawsuit said. Smith and now-Tennessee Titans tight end Walker were allegedly intoxicated on Smiths balcony when they fired gunshots in the air while trying to end the party, the lawsuit said. Smith, selected seventh overall in the 2011 draft out of Missouri, had previously been arrested on suspicion of DUI in January 2012 in Miami shortly after the 49ers lost in the NFC championship game. Baalke and the rest of the 49ers hope Smith will learn a lesson at last, and become a better person because of it. Smith said during a January interview with The Associated Press he was encouraged by his strides and confident he had made positive changes in his life. “Im a firm believer in the humanistic approach to everything. You continue to work just like you would with any family member,” Baalke said. “Were a family. You dont just open the door and toss people out of it. You continue to work until they leave you no choice. Thats what were going to do. Were going to continue to work with him, were going continue to find ways to support, not defend, we cannot defend the actions of others, all we can do is support.” Cheap Jerseys USA.C. – Goodyear has warned teams that increased speeds at Charlotte Motor Speedway will put a heavy emphasis on the right front tires in Saturday nights race a€” a potentially key development for drivers trying to advance in the Chase for the Sprint Cup Championship. Cheap NFL Jerseys Store. Ferguson told Uniteds in-house TV channel on Saturday that he has no immediate plans to walk away from the game, and that he still hungers for more trophies even after 25 years in charge of the club. http://www.cheapjerseyssell.us.com/.J. – Trying to learn and absorb the new West Coast offence being installed by new offensive co-ordinator Ben McAdoo, the New York Giants wrapped their final organized team activity Thursday before a three-day mini-camp next week. Wholesale Jerseys China. PAUL, Minn. Cheap Authentic Jerseys Online. JOHNS, N.Indianapolis, IN (SportsNetwork.com) – The Indiana Pacers signed head coach Frank Vogel to a contract extension on Wednesday. Vogel led the Pacers to a 56-26 record last seeason and a second consecutive Central Division title.dddddddddddd The 41-year-old had also earned a contract extension in January of 2013. More to follow. Wholesale Jerseys ‘ ‘ ‘

October 11, 2015

Metabolism: Cristin Richard, Detroit Design Festival, 25-Sep-2015

by Jim Welke

Metabolism / Cristin Richard photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

Metabolism / Cristin Richard
photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

Invited to participate in Detroit Design Festival 2015 (September 22-26, 2015), Detroit artist Cristin Richard presented her one night installation, Metabolism, in the c.1927 Detroit Savings Bank building at 5001 Grand River (near Warren; formerly occupied by Kunsthalle). In addition, she collaborated with Simone Else to create delicate bondage implements overlaid with intestines shown in the bank vault. (More about that follows.)

Metabolism comprised the main attraction for this ambitious, moody, soulful, one-night show. The installation consisted of a video projected large–twelve feet or so high–on the rear wall of the bank building main floor. As you entered the darkened room, illuminated only by the projected imagery of the video, you found yourself confronted by a languid, nubile siren (Emilee Burnadette Austin) tearing diaphanous bits of yellow, green, and ochre colored pig intestine from her otherwise nude body. In accompaniment you heard an eerie, raspy soundtrack by Detroit musician/composer Nate Czarling (info on him here & here) that emits scratched phonograph record sounds mixed with a repeating strings riff, alongside a Morse-code-like percussion on a cowbell-ish device.

Metabolism (intro) by TT Moross
The repetition, phonograph-record-skip-like, over and over, hypnotizes the listener, draws them into a receptive, passive, yet enervated state while the girl on the screen peels off the detritus of civilization–her clothing–clothing shattered, extraneous and superfluous. Ms. Richard constructed that clothing, as translucent and feathery as bits of sloughed sunburned skin, from the flotsam of mass-slaughter in our invisible industrial abattoirs. But you might not know this yet–that the enigmatic being on the screen peels off bits of animal offal–as you observe, transfixed, submerged in the cabin pressure of Mr. Czarling’s audio ecosystem. You watch: peel-peel-peel. You hear: skip-skip-skip. And then your eyes adjust to your tenebrous surroundings, someone else occupies the room: a girl, youthful, and naked but for wisps of that translucent intestinal fabric settled on the landscape of her lithe body, dead and laid out in a coffin. At least, she’s dead to you. You feel disoriented, in another country, a strange land with strange customs.

Metabolism / Cristin Richard photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

Metabolism / Cristin Richard photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

Richard, on her website, describes her work this way:

…It transforms and regenerates in poetic and unpredictable ways.  In the majority of her work, she reconstructs animal intestines into tangible objects. Playing on the ambiguity, created by the presence of this material, she develops metaphors loaded with complexities.

…With the idea of fashion as sculpture, Cristin Richard blurs the line between fine art and fashion.  She believes that fashion allows one to create a second skin.  It provides an escape that is rooted in the truth to one’s own identity.

Yoko Ono expressed thoughts on feminism, fashion, and subjugation of women when she created her performance “Cut Piece” in 1964 (excerpt here). While distinctly different in form and intent–Ono performed the piece, with audience participation–Richard’s work does follow from it in the sense that it puts the female form on a stage, not for entertainment as we have done at the expense of women for centuries, but more so as trial evidence. And then Richard brings in the added dilemma of our obsession in Western Civilization with mass-marketed, mechanistic consumerism, in this case our often callous consumption of animals bred, raised, and killed solely for us to devour in a frenzy of overfed fast-food surfeit. Cristin Richard, in “Metabolism” seems to ask that we run the film of our existence in reverse; in fact, that we imagine a reversion to a more primal past when clothing served more for protection against cold and predators. The animals we pursued then sometimes pursued us. And consumed us. Animals provoked us to respect them as physical and intellectual forces. Most pre-historic and modern aboriginal cultures harbor reverence for animals they hunt. They recognize in them spirits to honor. And they squander very little of the animals they fell. They never take them for granted, and they never hunt beyond the needs of subsistence. To do so would imperil the existence of both them and their prey.

But we, in our mechanized, me-first civilization stray from our ancestral roots. We treat animals as lifeless commodities and rather than public reverence we hide away from view the animals we kill in “meat processing plants.” We deny these living, breathing beings the honor they deserve while we dump their flesh wrapped in plastic in supermarket refrigerator bins or Styrofoam take-away packages.

Richard seems to want to slap us upside the head for our arrogance and hubris; to remind us that we share much in common with the animals we consume, that we consume too much, and that we need to peel away, layer by layer, the excesses of our culture. One solution is to regress like Ms. Austin in the video toward innocent disavowal of unneeded attire, toward a less self-absorbed, self-conscious perspective. But between the observer and the projected video, that enigmatic corpse lies in state. Is the video projected here like those melancholy videos created by suicide bombers prior to self-destruction?

Is the girl in the casket the girl in the video? Did she shed her corporeal connection to civilization at the expense of her life? Is Richard telling us that our modern, cultivated entanglements–our overly elaborate food, clothing, shelter, and transportation–imperil us even if we back away from them? Have our material entanglements embedded themselves in our psyches so deeply that to eschew them is the equivalent of suicide? Is it really impossible to get back to the Garden and a place of simplicity and authenticity?

That, at least, is what this writer saw projected on the screen and lying in the casket in that old bank building. Once you removed yourself from the enveloping video with funeral casket and soundscape that Richard and Czarling parachute you into, you moved into a room that housed the Detroit Savings Bank vault. This room presented a soundtrack different from the track in the lobby: Metabolism II. (VAULT) by TT Moross

photo: Jim Welke

Metabolism / Cristin Richard & Simone Else
photo: Jim Welke

Arrayed on two tables in this unventilated crypt-like room Richard and fellow artist Simone Else present their collaborative effort: a collection of everyday, and not so everyday objects, that when observed collectively suggest sexual bondage, or at least sex with a spicy flavor. But these objects take on a more complex meaning, here in this savings bank vault. (Savings bank vault, epicenter of white bread American delusions of permanent security!) What might otherwise offhandedly be construed as sex toys, here appear wrapped ever so delicately, precisely, and carefully in a patina of that same animal intestine that decorates the dead and living women in the grand but decrepit bank lobby. Again, you may not know at first that what decorates, surrounds, and subsumes these objects is in fact that same pellucid membrane adorning those women in the funereal lobby. But you read the text that accompanies the show, and you learn and consider this.

Metabolism / Cristin Richard & Simone Else photo: Jim Welke

Metabolism / Cristin Richard & Simone Else
photo: Jim Welke

Else and Richard might suggest with their work here that those things we consume, those beings that we presume to dominate, in fact dominate us. That we become embedded in our excesses, and by allowing that to happen, we allow ourselves to be altered, controlled by our appetites that ultimately circle back and consume us, like the self-consuming snake, or ouroboros, of which Carl Jung suggests:

This ‘feed-back’ process is at the same time a symbol of immortality, since it is said of the Ouroboros that he slays himself and brings himself to life, fertilizes himself and gives birth to himself. He symbolizes the One, who proceeds from the clash of opposites, and he therefore constitutes the secret of the prima materia which [...] unquestionably stems from man’s unconscious.

The self-consuming snake implies renewal, or a nagging desire for it; but a renewal preceded by self-destruction. So following this paradigm, we have a future: a future that does not include us.

Overall, the narrative of Richard’s “Metabolism”–lobby and vault–might be a cautionary tale, a looking outward by this artist who seems to see peril on the horizon of our human political and cultural landscape. Like most hegemonic civilizations, our global, interconnected, technology-empowered, overfed society, with so many pushed to the margins by relentless poverty, will likely founder as our Sumerian, Egyptian, Mayan, Aztec, Chinese, Greek and Roman predecessors did.

At a more basic level, as most top of the food chain mammals go, one million years seems to be about the limit before extinction unceremoniously knocks them from the tree of life. We humans, at least as a genus, are these days at about 2.5 million years–a bit past our prime. Then again, humans anatomically and behaviorally identical to us have been around for only about 200,000 years. So statistically, we may have a while to go. Still, there’s nothing to say we moderns don’t break out of the rut of tradition and statistics and extinct ourselves much sooner than our mammalian brethren.

So, if you cast your interpretive net wide, as this writer does, you see that the work shown in the old Detroit Savings Bank by Ms. Richard and her able collaborators, Else, Czarling, and Austin, takes on, if not kicks out, the very underpinnings of modern consumerist society. For that, the artist deserves an extra accolade: she looks inward first, but then outward at the cultural milieu that created her. Rather than being self-absorbed, she presents socially aware work. She offers an indictment of us all for blithely perpetuating the self-destructive world we live in. A slick attorney could submit numerous defenses to this indictment–it’s not a conviction after all–but Ms. Richard demands reflection followed by answers from all of us. And that takes courage on both a personal and professional level.

We might slip through on the lesser charge of involuntary manslaughter, but unless greater society pays more attention to the evidence that such insightful artists and scientists present, and then change our self-destructive ways, the art and science may survive, locked away in vaults, but we humans will not.

Metabolism / Cristin Richard & Simone Else photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

Metabolism / Cristin Richard & Simone Else
photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

 

Metabolism / Cristin Richard & Simone Else photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

Metabolism / Cristin Richard & Simone Else
photo: Bruno Vanzieleghem

Metabolism: Cristin Richard, Detroit Design Festival, 25-Sep-2015

 

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July 30, 2013

muslin.charcoal.brick.sticks.rope.paint @ Butter Projects

by Jim Welke

muslin.charcoal.brick.sticks.rope.paint -- project concept by Alison Wong

muslin.charcoal.brick.sticks.rope.paint — project concept by Alison Wong

Not every gallery group show springs from a gallery operator’s urge to shower accolades on the artists invited. Sometimes the gallery takes a little more capricious approach when formulating a show. As evidence, consider muslin.charcoal.brick.sticks.rope.paint at Butter Projects in Royal Oak MI (opened 26-July, runs thru 30-Aug-2013).

Alison Wong, the director and co-founder of Butter Projects (recently joined by her partner, John Charnota, who will develop additional programming: workshops, publications, and other one-offs), premised this show on the requirement that the artists create works using only the materials indicated in the title of the show. Further, Ms. Wong apportioned those materials equally to each artist. So, participants were faced with the challenge of creating an artwork in a limited period, using a limited set of media.

The artists are: Laura Beyer, Brittany Campbell, Andy Krieger, Sarah Lapinksi, Ash Nowak, and Bailey Scieszka.

The outcome proved engaging. Participants created artwork that reflected their predilections, but all of the works shared the provided common elements: muslin, charcoal (roughly 1/2” thick, 6” sticks), brick (red, with three perforations), sticks (plain, old Michigan branches — maple, oak, whatever), rope (that cheesy yellow nylon, about 3/8”), paint (kind of a grayish, cornflower blue).

To see the ensuing creations felt sort of like watching a bunch of recruits go through induction into the military. All the distinguishing characteristics they show up with are stripped away, and from the other end of the tunnel emerges the same crew, but with more in common than vice versa. That’s a complicated way of saying the artists imbued these works with their personalities, but the materials also imposed themselves on the artists. Factor in the stakes — at least a bit of the artists’ credibility and reputation — along with some inevitable competitiveness, and out of the sausage machine comes some rare specimens.

On one wall of the gallery, near the back, near the administrative/wine-and-cheese-cube section, there hangs a sheet of white sheetrock with samples of the apportioned materials affixed in orderly rows and columns like you might see products proudly arrayed in the lobby of a widget factory. This board represents the starting point for the artists, their mission if they choose to accept it. And their mission was not a nice, linear, point-A-to-point-B kind of assignment, like build a picnic table or leisure suit from these materials. All they got were the materials and no other guidance. Take the stuff and go. And don’t come back until you’ve got something you’re willing to hang on the wall (or stand on the floor) and point to it, and say to the world, “That’s my creation.”

Yes. I do think it took courage for these artists to accept this mission. Not art school, classroom, what-happens-in-Vegas-stays-in-Vegas courage, but real world, no one forgets, what-have-you-done-for-me-lately-courage.

But for visitors to the gallery the experience was all fun and games, either from now thru the end of August, or at the opening, which was probably the most fun because all the artists where there, and at openings you get to toss out ill-considered observations and the poor folks who struggled to lay gifts at your feet must politely listen and respond enthusiastically. That takes courage, too.

Fun and games with an edge might describe it more accurately. Art never comes devoid of an edge. At least not art worth mentioning. If it lacks edge, then it might be pure craft — even high-quality, worth-owning craft — but not art. So as the visitor moves through the gallery, she observes the works created from these six not entirely complementary materials and wonders what she’s looking at. Is it as simple as it seems?

If you enter through the front door (as you should), a creation by Laura Byer titled Curtain might be the first thing you see. She calls it a window treatment, which sounds too pedestrian for what she did to the windows. She applied bushels of sticks, some painted, some au naturel, all bound into loose, cable and wing-like constructs. Some sticks wrapped in muslin, some loosely bound by muslin so that the muslin becomes sort of a tendon that pulls the bones together. Nylon rope, stripped into its constituent fibers, formed the more structural ligaments along the vertical, supporting columns of sticks. The final element, bricks, formed a foundation line along the bottom of the windows, which the whole affair framed with dramatic effect. Looking through the gallery windows framed with this “treatment,” you feel yourself transported backward into a pre-industrial world of thatch and twine, bones and sinew, rough-hewn existence where you became what you made with your hands. Nothing else, beyond your natural unsympathetic surroundings existed. Curtain doesn’t dress up a window, it creates one — a big one.

Curtain / Laura Byer

Curtain / Laura Byer

Curtain / Laura Byer

Curtain / Laura Byer

Next, on your right, you might spot a smaller-scaled installation, Signals, Shorthand, and other Alerts, by Ash Nowak: a series of three banner-like swaths of muslin, about the size of place mats, suspended from sticks threaded through sleeves sewn in the top — sewn with strands of yellow nylon rope fiber. The sticks, in turn, were attached to the wall by lengths of that yellow rope tied to each end of the stick, and elevated in the center to form a triangle. On the muslin, near the bottom, are marks made with the requisite charcoal stick; marks applied as obtuse-angled hatch marks that take on the appearance of a field of grain, perhaps. Or, the evaporating surface of a fermenting corn mash if you’re into bourbon, which this writer is. Together, the banners, each similarly marked, form a triptych that somehow calms the viewer’s mind (this viewer at least) with its constancy, balance, and gentle assertion.

 

Signals, Shorthand, and other Alerts / Ash Nowak

Signals, Shorthand, and other Alerts / Ash Nowak

Signals, Shorthand, and other Alerts / Ash Nowak

Signals, Shorthand, and other Alerts / Ash Nowak

Moving counter-clockwise, the next object one encounters will be a mixed-media sculpture/installation that should dispel some of the calm found in the previous work. Brick Face Rope Lips, created by Bailey Scieszka, captures an enervating presence. Comprised of a suit of clothing constructed of linen (muslin, with poetic license), the pants adorned with words scrawled on them in charcoal, the jacket painted with a brick-like pattern of muslin-beige and that grayish, cornflower blue. Enshrouded by the jacket, forming the trunk of a headless being, a video monitor plays an endless loop showing a masked, brick-patterned face with lips of yellow rope against a brick-ish background field similar in color and pattern to that painted on the jacket. One hand of a person — a spirit — holds the mask in place, while the other continuously reapplies lip-gloss to the rope lips. Headphones continuously emit a musical beat — a slowed down version of the early 90′s group Ace of Base “all that she wants” (see video). The effect, after donning the headphones, feels sort of disturbing in a voyeuristic way. You can’t be sure what to make of this creature, neither alive nor dead. Zombie-like perhaps. But the sculpture snares you with its disarming, rag-tag uniform, technological spectacle, and ritual-like lip-gloss application to a lifeless mask. You feel sort of ripped out of the moment, whatever moment you were in, and dropped on a remote island where the native non-human beings do strange things for unknown but important reasons.

Brick Face Rope Lips / Bailey Scieszka

Brick Face Rope Lips / Bailey Scieszka

Brick Face Rope Lips / Bailey Scieszka

Brick Face Rope Lips / Bailey Scieszka

Next, you will encounter Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine, an installation by Brittany Campbell with a more direct application of video — at least in the sense we usually think of video: to present an evolving story or documentary. Here, a flat monitor dominates a dividing wall of the gallery. Elements of the project, and constituents of the video — sticks, charcoal, a brick — surround the monitor, protruding mysteriously from the wall as though transposed there by a quantum anomaly. Cornstalks painted blue, with roots wrapped in muslin and bound with yellow rope, spread out into the gallery and extend the field of this work beyond that one wall where they overtake the room like overfed GMO crops gone astray. In the video, we see hands resting on crossed legs that incrementally carve a point onto a charcoal stick; cut to the hand tracing a delicate outline on a bicep, followed by a series of cuts to bucolic outdoor scenes: the rope as a jump rope, the corn as it is painted blue, a sun-dappled patch of lush grass, a face seen through one of those brick perforations as fingertips apply charcoal to the inner surface, sticks laid down and set alight, sticks propped vertically and set alight (to create charcoal). Here, another ritual, more familiar than that in the previous work, but equally enigmatic — perhaps more enigmatic in its deeper complexity and longer series of unexplained events. You don’t know what you are witnessing, but you know it holds significance for the participant, like a prelude to tragic journey, or the beginning of a momentous, irreversible act.

 

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Cornfields Smell Better In Sunshine / Brittany Campbell

Next a work by Sarah Lapinski, You Have to Earn the Yes, suspended from ductwork near the ceiling via diaphanous threads, a ladder made of that yellow rope binding together rungs of sticks. Hovering there in space, suspended by all but invisible threads, this ladder does not appear to be for the here and now, for flesh and blood beings of ponderous substance. Children perhaps could ascend it if it were securely suspended. But it’s not. It hangs there, provoking you to wonder if it’s purely a representation of a ladder; a ladder as symbol for some other act or force; a ladder to Heaven or from Hell. Given the latter option, one feels a bit deflated at finding oneself already down here. Given the former, one feels a bit discouraged by the impossibility of safe ascent. Either way you lose. C’est la vie, mes copains. But, on the wall just behind the ladder you find a sort of shrine to hope: a collection of muslin swatches, about the size of handkerchiefs folded in half, pinned to the wall. Adjacent, another bit reads, “Put on this hook.” And adjacent to that, a hook for pieces from the first set, but inscribed with charcoal by gallery visitors. On the right side, you only read the top leaf, unless you’re particularly assertive and lift each one to reveal those underneath. But that would be an infraction. As you pencil in your words with the earthy charcoal stick (coloring your fingers with carbon black) you add a line to a poem or a prayer in progress for which you might not know the preceding lines and certainly don’t know the following. This work presents endless collaborative possibility — at least until the swatches run out. Then one faces a decision: replenish the blanks, or do laundry and wash away the past. Either way, the ladder waits, so write well.

You Have to Earn the Yes / Sarah Lapinski

You Have to Earn the Yes / Sarah Lapinski

You Have to Earn the Yes / Sarah Lapinski

You Have to Earn the Yes / Sarah Lapinski

You Have to Earn the Yes / Sarah Lapinski

You Have to Earn the Yes / Sarah Lapinski

Finally, you come to an installation by Andy Krieger, Mad at the Moon, comprised of a painting on a concave, conic-section of arcing wood overstretched with canvas. A blue moon emerges from a forest of inky, charcoal black branches interlocked as a screen penetrable only by light (and dark). Like a provocative sentinel, a column topped with a miniature catapult (trebuchet, if you’re into Medieval French, we’re told) and a pile of brick fragments stands before the painting. The catapult, constructed of sticks and rope, aims at the center of that gorgeous, ominous werewolf moon. The execution of these constituent elements is so sublime, the moon and trees rendered so lush, you take it all for granted. “Mad At The Moon,” you are invited to launch brick shards into the lunar surface. “Of course,” you say to yourself as you wind up and let fly.

During the run of the exhibition the gallery is open on Friday from 1-5, Saturday 1-3, and by appointment. Closing reception on August 30th at 7pm — get out and see the show, it’s worth it.

 

Andy Krieger, Mad at the Moon

Andy Krieger, Mad at the Moon

Andy Krieger, Mad at the Moon

Andy Krieger, Mad at the Moon

 

Andy Krieger, Mad at the Moon

Andy Krieger, Mad at the Moon

Alison Wong getting it together...

Alison Wong getting it together…

 

June 11, 2013

Christopher Samuels :: New Works and Short Films

Christopher Samuels: New Works & Short Films opened on Saturday, 8-June 2013 at Popps Packing in Hamtramck.

For the show, Mr. Samuels divided the gallery into three rooms, one for film screening, one for dance, and one for installation work. For the latter, Mr. Samuels transformed the gallery itself into an installation. When you enter, your first thought might be, “What the hell?” The works make use of artifacts of the room to cloud the distinction between artwork and gallery. The gallery is the artwork. You will not see a white cube with objects and title cards beside them. In fact, the work here verges on participatory in the sense that the visitor feels disoriented, uncomfortable, unsure how to react — at least this one did, as did others asked for their reaction — visitors mill about, searching for landmarks in a strange dance of their own.

The room feels spare and industrial, unfinished. A sense of the place, Mr. Samuels said, dictated what happened in the room. He looked around at the odd shaped walls, with alcoves and doorways, and tweaked them with objects he placed thereabout. He hoped the objects would feel organic, he said. They do, but at the same time they are jarring — like a tumor, organic but indicative of illness. An LED light down under a sewer grate, glows upward like a compound-eyed alien trapped beneath the iron bars.

IMG_1751

A set of clinical white curtains across a wide doorway to an alcove, backlit with harsh florescent light, forms another work. That streaming glare from between those curtains, like an operating room dropped into this high-ceilinged former industrial space feels spooky; it almost makes you shudder, and it might if you were alone in that room.

IMG_1752

A semi-circular florescent tube set on top of a pipe outlet inset into the battered concrete floor, the electrical parts of the lamp concealed by a rag, glowed like a strange interface to some unseen, menacing machine.

Nearby, prints of three prismatic color smears in various orientations and resolutions hang beside a simple gray scale transition; all unlabeled, as though readily interpretable or usable to those in the know. But you are not in the know. At least not when you enter this room.

IMG_1744

A projector down near the floor shines the image of a hand, index finger extended, pointing to something unseen on the floor. A piece of glass, propped between the projector and the wall at a forty-five degree angle redirects a washed out facsimile of the moving, gesturing, imploring hand onto the adjacent wall.

IMG_1745

Shreds of foliage adorn an apparently functional gas meter, pipes projecting from a wall and disappearing through the concrete floor. The foliage might be reclaiming this room for Mother Nature, except the foliage is dead and desiccated. Reclamation aborted.

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A black and orange plastic spool rests inexplicably in the center of the room, in peril of stray kicks by passersby. No matter, its relevance, or irrelevance persists.

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Black plastic netting drapes the corner of one wall. Remnants of a former purpose that now only form patterns.

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Up high, concealing a row of windows, Mr. Samuels installed a semi-transparent mural comprised of multiple sheets turned out to the street. During the day, you see the mural in the room, but reversed, like a window sign. At night, the image fades and the sheets take on a pale blue due to insufficient light penetrating from outside.

IMG_1753

In the next room, Mr. Samuels ran his short films in a continuous loop. They are: Indian Shield (4:56), Loosie (4:00), Indian Jim (5:24). All of them projected a haunting sense that disaster lurked around the corner, but all imply disaster might yet be averted. The saturated color hints they were shot on 16mm film, but this effect could be digital magic. The sound comes a bit muffled at times, especially in a crowded room; words get lost.

Indian Shield and Indian Jim featured the same actor, telling a self-revealing story, but from slightly different perspectives. In Hollywood’s reductive shorthand, think Midnight Cowboy meets Blue Velvet: the images seem straightforward, but the soundtrack and the editing create a nasty sense of foreboding. Both feature a man recovering from a shoulder injury and subsequent surgery, but both were about more than that. Indian Shield included additional actors, scenes of the roiling surface of the sun (Indian shield?) and a narrator telling of times when it is safe to stare into its glare. A party, after much tossing back of shots, ends with a peculiar toast to art. The film ends with the lead actor and another man doing Tai Chi beside a porta-john, aching it seems to keep their shit together, even if they are the only ones who believe they actually might.

Indian Jim features the same actor and the same shoulder injury, but he does pushups here, insists on recovery, and ends with the man, shot face on, riding a bike through downtown Detroit at night. With both of these films, one gets the sense of watching a stranger kicked to the curb by a capricious labor market in a post-industrial town where a man without formal education credentials, or adequate drive to re-create himself, ends up disenchanted, deluded, and desperate for a leg up from a society that mostly doesn’t give a damn about him and wishes he would disappear. But he won’t — Mr. Samuels proves that.

Loosie, opens with a woman walking on the sidewalk in a rundown neighborhood. Soon she arrives at a dingy home. She rattles off numerous banal hardships in her life with a cigarette scratched voice, until she finally describes her home as a jail where no one visits. There are lots of close in shots, and her suffering infects the viewer with a desperate sense of malaise. The film ends with Loosie walking down the same sidewalk towards an unknown destination. Things may turn out all right, but one senses that for an impoverished and disenfranchised woman, life is nasty, brutish, and (mercilessly) short.

Towards the end of the evening as scheduled for the opening, Paul Bancell, Megan Major and Sam Horning performed a dance piece that both complemented and extended Mr. Samuels’ transformation of the gallery. They all moved with grace and emanated emotion that suddenly made the small space allotted to their performance seem large. Their use of the “found” stage — not a formal stage with formal lighting and formal wings — mirrored Mr. Samuels’ adaptation of the gallery space. The movement flowed effortlessly and gorgeously from the dancers, and this old meatpacking plant became somewhere else; took on a new set of dimensions.

Mr. Samuels’ show takes the typical polished, tightly curated gallery show and smacks it in the head. This is not the sort of show where “the women come and go / talking of Michelangelo.” You should feel out of your element here, whomever you are. The artwork of Mr. Samuels breaks standard assumptions about the presentation and constitution of art and erases standard descriptive vocabulary for such events. The art here might be described as dadaist (anti-art, embraces chaos, opposes conventional standards); postminimalist (uses existing objects, esthetic depends on form); fluxus (mixes media: sculptural objects, prints, painting, mural, film, music, dance, the gallery space, the audience, the happening, all of it!).

Or maybe its none of that, and just happens to be what Christopher Samuels gives us. No matter how you describe it, Mr. Samuels took a risk conceiving and presenting this show. It’s an all or nothing, what have you done for me lately world for artists, and one misstep can send their career off the rails. So I do define what the artist did here as real risk, requiring real premeditation, and that, aside from subjective artistic merit, is what separates this from what any six year old can do (to refute a remark in a review by a British newspaper of a Henry Moore show). We all need to be smacked in the head once in a while. The show runs through 29-June.

Here’s a poem to ponder:

Apology

Why do I write today?

The beauty of
the terrible faces
of our nonentities
stirs me to it:

colored women
day workers—
old and experienced—
returning home at dusk
in cast off clothing
faces like
old Florentine oak.

Also

the set pieces
of your faces stir me—
leading citizens—
but not
in the same way.

William Carlos Williams

 

June 10, 2013

SAY YES! :: David Edward Parker

Opening, "Say Yes!" at Hatch in Hamtramck 8-June-2013

Opening, “Say Yes!” at Hatch in Hamtramck 8-June-2013

by Jim Welke

“Say Yes!” — an exhibition of works by David Edward Parker opened Saturday, June 8 2013, at Hatch in Hamtramck. A crowd turned out — to get through the door of the gallery one needed to share several pardon me’s, excuse me’s, step aside pal’s to find their way into the exhibition space of what was once the police station for Hamtramck. The intrepid members of the Hatch artist collective purchased the building for a dollar and then invested countless units of blood, sweat, and tears to convert a former bureaucratic nerve center for agents of public order into a nerve center for agents of sometimes cerebral disorder: the wide-open expression of artistic observation and thought.

The two, of course, do not exist in diametric conflict. Art flourishes in nurturing communities, absent the ravages of crime, and right across the street, within the walls of City Hall, the new police station resides. The City of Hamtramck, however, recently fell under the rule of an Emergency Financial Manager, appointed by Governor Snyder as a result (the Governor asserts) of the grave financial situation burdening the city.

Yet, the arts flourish, and in turn nurture their community despite looming economic perils. One hopes the leaders of the city and the governor notice. A good turnout at Mr. Parker’s show means a good turn out for Hamtramck — positive press and all.

Once in, first thing to catch your eye will be three large works, untitled, constructed of wood frames, foam board, and hockey tape. Black hockey tape, crossing over itself in random directions like a maze of two dimensional tree branches. The tape (used to wrap the business end of hockey sticks) covers the entire surface. The artist formed the frames into irregular polygons; polygons that represent recurring shapes residing in the artist’s subconscious and resurfacing from time to time, as Mr. Parker related it. The odd shaped planes echo the random rectilinear patterns of the tape and together they form a cohesive slice of captured chaos, if that makes sense. The unrelenting blackness draws your eyes ever closer, as you unconsciously search for recurring patterns that do not exist. These works seem to toy with our fear of the empty void, the nothingness but not truly nothingness from which everything seems to spring, and to which ultimately everything returns.

Untitled (detail) / hockey tape on foam / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Untitled (detail) / hockey tape on foam / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Adjacent to the large black expanses are four smaller works, entitled “Nervous Geometry,” ingeniously made of graphite on folded paper where the graphite adheres most densely on the previously folded now pressed flat paper. The folds form intersecting straight lines, similar in pattern to those on the hockey tape pieces, but much narrower and much sparser on the sheet. Beside the large black polygons they seem to represent an evolution, passage of time, an expansion of space where the lines become farther apart as their universe expands… and worlds form. Or so this observer sees it.

Nervous Geometry / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Nervous Geometry / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Untitled / 2013 & "Nervous Geometry" / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Untitled / 2013 & Nervous Geometry (1 of 4) / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Another work, Y.E.$ – NFS (graphite on paper, 2011), a triptych consisting of sheets devoted to the characters “Y,” “E,” and “$.” With the pictures aligned side-by-side (and rounding a corner at the far end of the gallery) one immediately reads the word “YES.” But as you approach them, the characters resolve into individual lotto cards dropped like overlapping leaves, as one so often encounters these cards outside the ubiquitous “LIQUOR, LOTTO, CHECKS-CASHED” shops that seem to be the sole source of sustenance in Detroit neighborhoods. The discarded losing tickets on wet pavement stick to the soles of your shoes and insistently remind you of the eternal hopefulness, or in some cases desperation, of the purchasers of these long odd opportunities of chance. Comprised of hundreds of these tickets drawn with incomprehensible precision by Mr. Parker, this triptych seems to mock that syrupy mantra of lotto vendors and users, “You gotta be in it to win it.” The cheerful “YES” feels betrayed by its formation from hundreds of discarded losing tickets that represent many hundreds of precious dollars expended by hopeful or desperate purchasers, dollars that might be more profitably spent on food, clothing, transportation, or rent. The dollar sign at the end enforces this notion of state-sanctioned monitizing of hope.

"Y.E.$" / 2011 / David Edward Parker

“Y.E.$” / 2011 / David Edward Parker

"Y.E.$" (detail) / 2011 / David Edward Parker

“Y.E.$” (detail) / 2011 / David Edward Parker

Surrounding the uniform detritus of Y.E.$, you will see numerous images of crushed pop cans (All The Coolest Kids At 7-11[Coke], [Red Bull], [Four Loco] — colored pencil on paper, 2013) and cigarette packs (Flavor Country, colored pencil on paper, 2013). Like a post-post-modern take on Andy Warhol’s pristine soup cans and soap boxes, Mr. Parker shows these objects as we most often see them: crumpled litter soiling the sidewalks and gutters of our streets. In fact, we see them so often we almost do not perceive them, except convulsively when we cry out, “Shit! Who’s dropping all this crap?” and then comfort ourselves with righteous indignation and resume ignoring them. Here, Mr. Parker carefully renders the crap in both color and form, lifted from the gutter and dropped on a pure snowy white surface. Look at them! Perceive them, Mr. Parker seems to say, they are us, the perpetual output of our civilization, output that seems to have supplanted our prouder output of the past: solid, lasting, manufactured widgets that added convenience, productivity, and prosperity to our lives instead of dangerous crap.

All The Coolest Kids At 7-11[Coke], [Red Bull], [Four Loco] / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

All The Coolest Kids At 7-11[Coke], [Red Bull], [Four Loco] / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

 

Flavor Country / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Flavor Country / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Flavor Country / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Flavor Country / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Flavor Country / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Flavor Country / colored pencil on paper / 2013 / David Edward Parker

Other work exhibited includes, Quite Revealing, a pink neon sign glowing low on the wall as though a strange interloper commenting on the show… or the visitors. A video, Pleasure Seekers, that captures a relentless stream of strollers at an auto show (Detroit?) gazing happily, wistfully, covetously at the landscape of the latest automobile models, but mostly it seems, just streaming dutifully through the show like pilgrims in Mecca. An untitled (though subtitled “pink sewing”, 2007) oil paint on canvas work hangs by itself in one corner, built from an accretion of nine smaller canvases sewn together, all painted in salmon-colored transitions from darker to light. To this viewer, the work suggested internal organs, squared off like a weird mystery meat patty, but with an eerie, austere elegance. But that might be the unique filter of this viewer’s eyes.

Untitled (Pink Sewing) / oil on canvas / 2007 / David Edward Parker

Untitled (Pink Sewing) / oil on canvas / 2007 / David Edward Parker

Go see the show for yourself. The works of David Edward Parker’s “SAY YES!” remain in the lockup at the Hatch precinct through 6-July. The show will startle and captivate you. Quite revealing, indeed.

September 23, 2009

film

Category: filmartifizz admin @ 10:37 pm
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carefully considered thoughts on film will be here